Category Archives: Tutorials

This is where we will post guide’s and tutorials on how to accomplish various things. We will try to keep this updated on weekly basis.

Popular Speedtest.net Bandwidth Tests Now from Within Your VPS or Server

Speedtest.net

Speedtest.net

Eventually most people wonder why their internet is again trickling packets at the speed of a 1950’s move plot. The unfortunate downside of internet connectivity slowdowns gets the best of us at times.

Sometimes it is our provider at fault, other times it is our provider’s upstream at fault.

As an end customer you need to determine these shortcomings yourself when seeking support help. The usual customer support routine often involves multiple reboots of your modem and lots of wasted time. The process leaves a lot to be desired.  If you are having a problem with a VPS or dedicated server the problems can be much more difficult to debug and resolve.

So let’s learn how to debug your slow internet connectivity problem a bit with a simple speed test site and tool for those running Linux.

#1 Know your Package Speeds

Every home internet package includes at least two speeds indicating the maximum throughput your service has been provisioned to achieve. Similarly, a VPS or dedicated server will have some sort of bandwidth speed promise. With home internet one speed will be the upload speed, or how fast you can send data from your computer up to the internet. The other speed will be your download speed, or how fast you can get data from the internet down to your computer.

Usually the download speed is much faster than the upload speed.

Look at your internet service details from your monthly invoice and see what package you have and what the advertised speeds are.

#2 Run Multiple Online Speed Tests

You want to get most of your advertised internet throughput speeds. It is not reasonable to achieve or exceed advertised speeds for any extended duration.

The most popular speed test site online remains Speedtest.net. Their site requires Adobe Flash to perform tests in your browser. They have Apps available for the most common mobile platforms: http://www.speedtest.net/mobile.

Perhaps you are a Linux user, or dislike Flash, or want to test your VPS or other non-graphic based server?

Sivel has wrote a Python based tool that quick and simple and uses Speedtest.net’s testing points. The tool is called, speedtest-cli [link: https://github.com/sivel/speedtest-cli].

(This tool will work in any environment where Python is or can be installed)

In Debian / Ubuntu and derivatives:

Become root:
su

apt-get install python

	wget -O speedtest-cli https://raw.github.com/sivel/speedtest-cli/master/speedtest_cli.py
	chmod +x speedtest-cli

To run speedtest-cli:

./speedtest-cli

How do your speeds look? Seem slow? Run the test several times and over several hours if possible to rule out LAN traffic or intermittent blips.

Still slow? Time to contact your ISP then.

#3 Contact Your Internet Service Provider (ISP)

When contacting your ISP or hosting provider about slow speeds you should have your speedtest-cli output on hand. Show them the test location used (which is automatically picked from a nearby test location), and throughput achieved which should help them debug problems. They might ask you to perform other tests to other network test points. If so see how to do that below.

It’s that simple to get started debugging issues with slow throughput.  There are a multitude of issues that contribute to slow connectivity.  These include hardware misconfiguration, bad physical connections, bad software settings, etc.

Further

Speedtest-cli has some additional features that might prove helpful.

List all the active testing locations:
./speedtest-cli –list | more

Select a specific testing point to perform a test with:
./speedtest-cli –server 1344

How to Save $71.88 a Year by Being Smarter than the Average Cable Internet Subscriber

Like most people living in the United States your home internet options are likely two:

The local phone company —- or  —- the cable company.

This duopoly leaves a lot to be desired. The local phone companies continue to linger in the 1990’s with ancient DSL technologies with puny upload side (i.e. 768k).  The cable company offers on paper at least,  are higher speed packages, but they often fail to deliver to expected levels in practice.

Let’s talk about one of America’s least favorite companies, Time Warner Cable.

At Time Warner Greed is Driving Bad Customer Experience

#2 US Cable Company Time Warner Cable is a textbook example of how not to treat customers.

Several years ago the cable giant decided in order to bolster their income bottom line they’d start charging their internet customers monthly for “renting a modem”.  The new fee applied to anyone not in an active promotional package.  Meaning millions of their customers started seeing a few dollars more on their bill for a modem they might have had freely for the better part of a decade.

Extending simple hypothetical math of Time Warner Cable internet customers at 10 million, and at least 50% of them being outside of a promotional gives us 5 million customers.

5 million customers each being charged $4 a month = $20 million a month
$20 million a month x 12 months = $240 million in new income per year

$180 million at least in new revenue created out of nowhere.

The Taking by Time Warner is even Greater

In a November 13, 2012, article in the NY Daily News documenting a class action lawsuit against Time Warner said that the $3.95 a month fee for modems would generate a whopping $500 million a year of new income to Time Warner.

Just imagine what the modem fee is generating today as Time Warner has jacked their monthly modem fee to $5.99 a month.  The modem fees don’t stop at $5.99 however.  Time Warner Cable wants $11.94 a month for a cable modem that bundles wifi on lower priced plans.  Same modem, same features, $5.95 a month more for customers who decide they can afford or only need slower internet service.

Normally such a massive taking from paying customers would be sold as the means to fund better services.  Not in Time Warner’s wonderland.  Time Warner has been an industry laggard with minimal investment in it’s cable system.  The disinvestment is one of the leading causes for future merger of Time Warner with another cable suitor.


Outdated Ancient Tech Gear Cash Cow for Time Warner

In my own experience, a Turbo Internet package from Time Warner was delivering far less than it should have been.  During peak hours (i.e. 9AM until midnight) performance lurked at times
near dialup speeds (those in rural America can sympathize).

A routine complete tear down of the cable company’s install found good cabling, a splitter at building entry point that was clean and to spec. The problem and  what I learned is that Time Warner years prior had issued us a lovely Scientific Atlanta modem, model # DPC2100R2, manufactured in May 2008.

After looking around I determined this modem was indeed a DOCSIS 2.0 modem, and the support manuals bear a creation date of 2002-2003.

Where else in technology is anyone using a 11-12 year old piece of gear like this?  It’s rare and almost always where disinvestment has occurred.  They are systems long ago abandoned, left to run for a few people until the hardware just stops.

The modem is so old that….  even Comcast has labeled the Scientific Atlanta DPC2100R2 end of life and won’t support it.

But, at Time Warner, they are happy to charge you $5.99 each and every month for housing the dinosaur in your home.  Hide it in your basement and tell inquiring minds you are starting a technology museum.


Why is DOCSIS 2.0 a Problem and Modem Charge Greed Creating Problems?

Cable internet has channels, just like their television offers conceptually.  Your cable modem can select the upstream network from the channels available to it.  Usually there are several channels the modem can choose from.

With DOCSIS 2, the modem can see multiple channels, but only can use a single channel at a time.

DOCSIS 3 is the current standard, and it allows for more channels viewable by your modem.  But the big improvement is channel bonding.  It can take multiple underperforming channels (i.e.
lots of your neighbors are using the internet and clogging things on Time Warner) and create one bigger channel, usually resulting in lower latency and faster throughput for you.

Typically, making the jump to DOCSIS 3, will result in faster internet speeds, lower ping times (latency) and minimize the performance dips during peak usage times (exception is those still
somehow lurking with Turbo plans which are not supported in DOCSIS 3).

To use DOCSIS 3 however, you will need a DOCSIS 3 modem.  That old Scientific America model from 2002-2003 isn’t DOCSIS 3 capable.

Meaning, Time Warner should have upgraded you and your neighbors at least on Standard Internet or greater plans to DOCSIS 3 modems years ago. Officially Time Warner completed it’s nationwide DOCSIS 3 upgrade in 2012.

Saving over $70 a year and Getting Better Internet Speeds in the Process

How would you spend $71.88 saved by not paying Time Warner for ancient underperforming modem?  Your money would be better spent on several months of a TMZVPS, or
a years worth of our TMZHOSTING shared hosting with a new domain (and you still would have money left over for dinner).

Saving on your Time Warner internet bill is simple.   You simply purchase an approved modem, call Time Warner customer support to have it activated on their network and get to setting it up yourself.  Total time is 1-2 hours to do this.  Those with modest technical know-how should be able to accomplish this.  Paying your tech advisor for an hour is well worth it otherwise.

Time Warner provides a list of the current models they support for customer owned modems (other models do work but you should check their forums or other online resources before buying a model not on the list below):
http://www.timewarnercable.com/en/support/internet/topics/buy-your-modem.html

Ebay seller Cents&Pennies sells a number of DOCSIS 3 used modems on Ebay.  I actually bought my new replacement DOCSIS 3 modem from Cents&Pennies:
http://stores.ebay.com/Cents-Pennies?_dmd=1&_nkw=time+warner+docsis+3

If you are on Time Warner’s Standard and below plans and are receiving the speeds you expect, you can stick with a DOCSIS 2 modem.  The DOCSIS 2 modems cost a lot less. That Scientific America DPC2100R2 I have lingering still? It’s $9.48 shipped on Ebay, used of course (that’s less than paying Time Warner fee for two months)
http://www.ebay.com/itm/WEBSTAR-DPC2100R2-CABLE-MODEM-DOCSIS-2-0-/331097129907?pt=PCC_Modems

Cable Internet Woes – America’s Worst Customer Ranked Company Earned Rank

A truck bearing a message is parked near a group of local residents and consumers organizations opposing Comcast's proposed merger with Time Warner Cable, as they protest the deal outside the Comcast Shareholders Meeting in Philadelphia

A truck bearing a message is parked near a group of local residents and consumers organizations opposing Comcast’s proposed merger with Time Warner Cable, as they protest the deal outside the Comcast Shareholders Meeting in Philadelphia

Resolving Time Warner’s customer service issues revolving around common underperforming network is this simple in many areas.  Upgrade the modem to DOCSIS 3. Time Warner has the capacity for customers but refuses to spend to upgrade customer equipment in a timely and correct manner all while letting them linger on ancient gear incapable of delivering service levels routinely that the customer subscribed to. This is all while gouging customers for $5.99 more a month for a bogus modem rental fee.  If anything Time Warner should be paying you to house their old surplus electronics.

The $5.99 a month modem fee is one glaring example of how corporate greed is destroying Time Warner and why absent regulator sanity we are all but expected to see the approval of the merger of Time Warner and larger rival Comcast.  Competition is needed in the marketplace. Opening up local cable systems like happened with the phone system should be the goal.  More competition for internet access, not less.

DNS – Often Overlooked and Overworked Essential Piece of the Internet

DNS MADE FASTER!

Optimizing your DNS Server Settings for a Faster Internet

DNS makes the internet run. DNS takes a human friendly domain name or URL like, www.disney.com and does a lookup to find the non-human IP where www.disney.com currently is pointing to —> 199.181.132.249. Imagine your favorite website being named 199.181.132.249 instead. That would be very hard to remember and not very brand recognizable.

DNS lookups are done by nearly all software these days, and DNS lookups are heavily used in modern web based software, and especially in smartphone applications.

Most users just accept whatever DNS server information they are fed by DHCP usually from their internet provider. The downsides of this acceptance comes in the forms of:

1. Reliability – Most providers feed you two DNS servers, typically with the very same server operator (think themselves or Google). If their server or network fails two options might mean one still works, but often this isn’t so true and their remaining resource shared by a large pool of customers quickly becomes overloaded or fails.

2. Often slow lookup speeds – Your internet provider might not be slow, instead their DNS probably is a main contributor as your DNS requests pile up in the DNS traffic jam. This can result in multiple second delays as your surf from site to site. It can cause all sorts of ugly failures in smartphone apps. In general the delays and failures break tons of things in way the developers never intended to deal with gracefully.

3. Random cache optimization – In order to reduce bandwidth for lookups and reduce DNS server resources while appearing to have faster lookups many companies employ caching of DNS records that ignores the TTL (length of time such record should cached).

4. DNS poisoning / capturing invalid or failed lookups – a non standard trick employed to capture bad requests and push the viewer to a page, search results or other portal where the DNS company makes money.

5. Privacy – He who controls the DNS lookup server knows everything that every customer is doing and using. That data is valuable to marketing firms, advertising companies, aggregators, etc. Many companies, ISPs, etc. are selling your data without your knowledge, and even companies like your ISP that you pay for service.

Goal

To optimize your DNS server selection for the best performance, and ideally with some awareness on the above five points we present namebench. Namebench is an open source and cross-platform DNS testing tool. It works under Linux, Windows and other common operating systems.

Project Page:
http://code.google.com/p/namebench/

 

How to Install Namebench on Debian Linux

Open your favorite terminal program (terminator, Root Terminal, etc.). Become root:

su
[provide root password]

Create a new directory:

mkdir ~/temporary
cd ~/temporary

Install Python:

apt-get install python

Download namebench:

wget http://namebench.googlecode.com/files/namebench-1.3.1-source.tgz

Unzip / Untar namebench:

tar -xzvf namebench-1.3.1-source.tgz

Run namebench:

cd namebench-1.3.1
./namebench.py

This will run a completely text based terminal output of the results. The output is very verbose.

————————————————————————————-
namebench 1.3.1 – best source (automatic) on 2014-09-30
threads=40/2 queries=250 runs=1 timeout=3.5 health_timeout=3.75 servers=11
——————————————————————————

– Reading Top 2,000 Websites (Alexa): data/alexa-top-2000-domains.txt (0.7MB)
– Reading Cache Latency Test (100% hit): data/cache-hit.txt (0.1MB)
– Reading Cache Latency Test (100% miss): data/cache-miss.txt (0.1MB)
– Reading Cache Latency Test (50% hit, 50% miss): data/cache-mix.txt (0.1MB)
– Generating tests from Top 2,000 Websites (Alexa) (33575 records, selecting 250 automatic)
– Selecting 250 out of 33542 sanitized records (weighted mode).
– Checking query interception status…
– Checking connection quality: 1/3…3/3
– Congestion level is 0.46X (check duration: 18.50ms)
– Checking latest sanity reference
– Building initial DNS cache for 4516 nameservers (40 threads)
– Checking nameserver availability (40 threads):

0/4516……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..916…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………1821……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….2736……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..3649………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….4516/4516

– 1021 of 4516 servers are available (duration: 0:03:17.742999)

– Removing secondary nameservers slower than 36.67ms (max=400)

– Running initial health checks on 213 servers (35 threads): 0/213……………………47………………………..104………………………..161………………….204…….213/213

– 203 of 213 tested name servers are healthy

– Making Google Public DNS-2 [ptr-216-8-179-23.ptr] the primary anycast – faster than Google Public DNS [ptr-216-8-179-23.ptr] by 3.75ms

– Making OpenDNS-2 [1.ash] the primary anycast – faster than OpenDNS [7.ash] by 15.43ms

– Making DynGuide [default] the primary anycast – faster than DynGuide-2 [default] by 4.80ms

– Making UltraDNS [IAD] the primary anycast – faster than UltraDNS-2 [4.34] by 12.52ms

– Picking 16 secondary servers to use (8 nearest, 8 fastest)

– Waiting for wildcard cache queries from 22 servers (22 threads): 0/22………..22/22

– Waiting 4s for TTL’s to decrement.

– Running cache-sharing checks on 22 servers (40 threads): 0/462x…………………………………………………………………………………….192………………………………………………………………………354……………………………………..xxxx!xxx.xxxxxxxxxxxxx!!!!!.!!!!!!!!!!!!!!xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx!!!..448!!!!!!!!!!…..!!!!..462/462

– Disabling Cable & Wireless DE [ash-cdns-1] – slower replica of Cable & Wireless DE-2 [ash-cdns-2] by 8.2ms.

– Picking 5 secondary servers to use (2 nearest, 3 fastest)

– Cable & Wireless DE-3 [141.1.1.1] appears to be the nearest regional (7.65ms)

– Running final health checks on 11 servers (11 threads): 0/11……11/11

– All nameservers have warning: www.paypal.com is hijacked: www.paypal.com.akadns.net (likely a false positive)

– All nameservers have warning: www.facebook.com appears incorrect: star.c10r.facebook.com (likely a false positive)

Final list of nameservers considered:
——————————————————————————
199.2.252.10 Sprintlink-2 14 ms | twitter.com appears incorrect: 199.16.156.230, 199.16.156.38, 199.16.156.6, 199.16.156.102, google.com appears incorrect: 173.194.123.35, 173.194.123.38, 173.194.123.36, 173.194.123.33, 173.194.123.40, 173.194.123.41, 173.194.123.37, 173.194.123.34, 173.194.123.32, 173.194.123.46, 173.194.123.39, www.google.com is hijacked: 173.194.46.114, 173.194.46.112, 173.194.46.115, 173.194.46.113, 173.194.46.116

199.45.32.38 BellAtlantic-2 US 14 ms | google.com appears incorrect: 173.194.121.7, 173.194.121.0, 173.194.121.3, 173.194.121.5, 173.194.121.8, 173.194.121.6, 173.194.121.4, 173.194.121.2, 173.194.121.9, 173.194.121.14, 173.194.121.1, twitter.com appears incorrect: 199.16.156.198, 199.16.156.6, 199.16.156.70, 199.16.156.230, www.google.com is hijacked: 74.125.225.19, 74.125.225.18, 74.125.225.17, 74.125.225.20, 74.125.225.16

151.197.0.38 Verizon Philadelph 18 ms | www.google.com is hijacked: 74.125.228.211, 74.125.228.210, 74.125.228.209, 74.125.228.208, 74.125.228.212, twitter.com appears incorrect: 199.16.156.230, 199.16.156.38, 199.16.156.102, 199.16.156.70

141.1.1.1 Cable & Wireless D 19 ms | twitter.com appears incorrect: 199.16.156.102, 199.16.156.198, 199.16.156.230, 199.16.156.38, www.google.com is hijacked: 173.194.46.115, 173.194.46.112, 173.194.46.114, 173.194.46.116, 173.194.46.113

8.8.4.4 Google Public DNS- 24 ms | twitter.com appears incorrect: 199.16.156.230, 199.16.156.198, 199.16.156.6, 199.16.156.70, www.google.com is hijacked: 74.125.225.147, 74.125.225.146, 74.125.225.148, 74.125.225.144, 74.125.225.145

4.2.2.3 Level 3/GTEI-3 26 ms | www.google.com is hijacked: 173.194.121.48, 173.194.121.49, 173.194.121.50, 173.194.121.51, 173.194.121.52, twitter.com appears incorrect: 199.16.156.102, 199.16.156.38, 199.16.156.6, 199.16.156.70

216.146.35.35 DynGuide 26 ms | www.google.com is hijacked: 74.125.225.82, 74.125.225.83, 74.125.225.81, 74.125.225.84, 74.125.225.80, NXDOMAIN Hijacking, twitter.com appears incorrect: 199.16.156.38, 199.16.156.230, 199.16.156.70, 199.16.156.6

208.67.222.222 OpenDNS-2 28 ms | twitter.com appears incorrect: 199.16.156.70, 199.16.156.38, 199.16.156.102, 199.16.156.6, www.google.com is hijacked: 74.125.225.146, 74.125.225.147, 74.125.225.144, 74.125.225.145, 74.125.225.148

156.154.70.1 UltraDNS 28 ms | www.google.com is hijacked: 74.125.228.116, 74.125.228.115, 74.125.228.114, 74.125.228.112, 74.125.228.113, NXDOMAIN Hijacking, twitter.com appears incorrect: 199.59.149.198, 199.59.150.7, 199.59.148.82, 199.59.148.10

4.2.2.1 Level 3/GTEI 29 ms | twitter.com appears incorrect: 199.16.156.70, 199.16.156.230, 199.16.156.38, 199.16.156.6, www.google.com is hijacked: 74.125.228.48, 74.125.228.52, 74.125.228.50, 74.125.228.49, 74.125.228.51

199.16.156.198, 199.16.156.6, google.com appears incorrect: 173.194.121.35, 173.194.121.36, 173.194.121.37, 173.194.121.38, 173.194.121.39, 173.194.121.40, 173.194.121.41, 173.194.121.46, 173.194.121.32, 173.194.121.33, 173.194.121.34, www.google.com is hijacked: 74.125.201.106, 74.125.201.147, 74.125.201.99, 74.125.201.103, 74.125.201.104, 74.125.201.105

– Sending 250 queries to 11 servers: 0/2750…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..552………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..1103…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….1658…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..2219…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………2750/2750

– Error querying Cable & Wireless DE-3 [141.1.1.1]: www.megaupload.com.: Timeout

– Error querying BellAtlantic-2 US [199.45.32.38]: www.megaporn.com.: Timeout

– Error querying Sprintlink-2 [199.2.252.10]: blog.yam.com.: Timeout

– Error querying Cable & Wireless DE-3 [141.1.1.1]: www.megaclick.com.: Timeout

Fastest individual response (in milliseconds):
———————————————-
Cable & Wireless ######################### 6.85501
Level 3/GTEI-3 ############################ 7.59315
OpenDNS-2 ############################ 7.65586
Level 3/GTEI ############################# 7.74908
DynGuide ############################# 7.77817
Sprintlink-2 ################################ 8.66008
BellAtlantic-2 U ################################ 8.68392
UltraDNS ################################# 8.97908
Verizon Philadel ############################################## 12.62689
Google Public DN ##################################################### 14.64987

Mean response (in milliseconds):
——————————–
Sprintlink-2 ##################### 139.66
Google Public DN ##################### 140.95
OpenDNS-2 ######################### 169.16
BellAtlantic-2 U ######################### 170.47
Cable & Wireless ########################## 175.92
UltraDNS ########################## 179.58
Verizon Philadel ############################## 207.50
DynGuide ################################ 217.10
Level 3/GTEI ################################################ 330.76
Level 3/GTEI-3 ##################################################### 367.95

Response Distribution Chart URL (200ms):
—————————————-

http://chart.apis.google.com/chart?cht=lxy&chs=720×415&chxt=x,y&chg=10,20&chxr=0,0,200|1,0,100&chd=t:0,4,5,5,6,8,12,20,35,43,50,63,78,92,105|0,0,21,32,36,40,45,49,52,56,60,64,67,71,74|0,1,1,2,5,7,9,10,13,17,22,28,40,47,55,67,81,100|0,0,13,18,23,26,30,36,40,44,48,51,55,58,62,66,69,73|0,4,5,5,6,7,8,11,13,18,28,42,50,63,70,83,109|0,0,11,22,29,33,38,42,46,50,53,57,61,65,68,72,76|0,7,8,9,10,11,13,14,18,30,43,61,118|0,0,22,50,58,62,67,71,74,78,82,85,89|0,4,4,7,8,10,12,15,39,47,54,71,89,129|0,0,4,30,52,55,60,64,68,71,75,78,82,86|0,4,5,7,8,9,12,16,35,54,65,95,122|0,0,5,27,45,52,60,64,68,71,75,78,82|0,4,5,6,7,7,9,13,19,35,65,85,120|0,0,32,45,54,58,61,65,69,72,76,80,84|0,3,4,5,6,6,9,13,36,39,44,55,71,96,114|0,0,21,40,46,51,55,59,63,66,70,74,78,82,86|0,4,5,5,6,9,12,17,34,44,46,56,75,91,122|0,0,21,31,37,41,46,49,53,56,60,64,67,71,74|0,4,5,6,7,9,14,22,36,42,55,72,101|0,0,25,49,54,58,62,65,69,73,77,81,84|0,6,7,8,10,11,13,14,15,17,19,22,25,45,51,74,92,126|0,0,12,26,31,34,39,42,46,52,56,59,63,67,71,75,78,82&chco=ff9900,1a00ff,ff00e6,80ff00,00e6ff,fae30a,BE81F7,9f5734,000000,ff0000,3090c0&chxt=x,y,x,y&chxl=2:||Duration+in+ms||3:||%25|&chdl=Level+3%2FGTEI|DynGuide|Google+Public+DNS-2|OpenDNS-2|UltraDNS|BellAtlantic-2+US|Cable+%26+Wireless+DE-3|Level+3%2FGTEI-3|Sprintlink-2|Verizon+Philadelphia+US-2

Response Distribution Chart URL (Full):
—————————————

http://chart.apis.google.com/chart?cht=lxy&chs=720×415&chxt=x,y&chg=10,20&chxr=0,0,3500|1,0,100&chd=t:0,0,0,0,0,0,1,1,2,2,3,4,4,5,6,7,9,17,29,44,59,100|0,0,21,32,36,40,45,49,52,56,60,64,67,71,74,78,82,86,89,93,96,100|0,0,0,0,0,0,1,1,1,1,1,2,2,3,3,4,5,6,7,9,11,16,26,59,100|0,0,13,18,23,26,30,36,40,44,48,51,55,58,62,66,69,73,77,80,84,88,91,95,100|0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1,1,1,2,2,3,4,4,5,6,8,10,14,18,26,35,100|0,0,11,22,29,33,38,42,46,50,53,57,61,65,68,72,76,79,83,86,90,94,97,100|0,0,0,1,1,1,1,1,1,2,2,4,7,14,19,100|0,0,22,50,58,62,67,71,74,78,82,85,89,92,96,100|0,0,0,0,0,1,1,1,2,3,3,4,5,7,11,14,24,100|0,0,4,30,52,55,60,64,68,71,75,78,82,86,89,93,96,100|0,0,0,0,0,1,1,1,2,3,4,5,7,9,10,18,29,100|0,0,5,27,45,52,60,64,68,71,75,78,82,86,90,93,97,100|0,0,0,0,0,0,1,1,1,2,4,5,7,8,10,19,60,100|0,0,32,45,54,58,61,65,69,72,76,80,84,87,91,94,98,100|0,0,0,0,0,0,1,1,2,2,3,3,4,5,7,9,14,31,100|0,0,21,40,46,51,55,59,63,66,70,74,78,82,86,89,93,96,100|0,0,0,0,0,1,1,1,2,3,3,3,4,5,7,9,11,15,26,48,96,100|0,0,21,31,37,41,46,49,53,56,60,64,67,71,74,78,82,86,89,93,96,100|0,0,0,0,0,1,1,1,2,2,3,4,6,7,9,14,100|0,0,25,49,54,58,62,65,69,73,77,81,84,88,92,96,100|0,0,0,0,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,3,3,4,5,7,9,11,18,33,100|0,0,12,26,31,34,39,42,46,52,56,59,63,67,71,75,78,82,86,89,93,97,100&chco=ff9900,1a00ff,ff00e6,80ff00,00e6ff,fae30a,BE81F7,9f5734,000000,ff0000,3090c0&chxt=x,y,x,y&chxl=2:||Duration+in+ms||3:||%25|&chdl=Level+3%2FGTEI||DynGuide|Google+Public+DNS-2|OpenDNS-2|UltraDNS|BellAtlantic-2+US|Cable+%26+Wireless+DE-3|Level+3%2FGTEI-3|Sprintlink-2|Verizon+Philadelphia+US-2

 

THIS IS WHAT YOU WANT TO NOTE:

Recommended configuration (fastest + nearest):
———————————————-
nameserver 199.2.252.10 # Sprintlink-2
nameserver 141.1.1.1 # Cable & Wireless DE-3
nameserver 4.2.2.2

******************************************************************************In this test, Sprintlink-2 is 119.6%: Faster
******************************************************************************

Some things to note:

There may be mentions of both hijacked domains and incorrect domains. This is a problem with DNS since this program was created. They are false positives on the hijacks.

Updating your DNS Servers for a Faster Internet

Let’s update our domain records and get moving faster! In Linux terminal as root:

nano /etc/resolv.conf

Delete the existing entries in /etc/resolv.conf and copy and paste the new server details from above:

nameserver 199.2.252.10 # Sprintlink-2
nameserver 141.1.1.1 # Cable & Wireless DE-3
nameserver 4.2.2.2

Save the /etc/resolv.conf file and exit. Now your DNS queries will be remarkably faster.

Other Experiments

Namebench supports testing IPv6 only DNS servers, if you are on an IPv6 enabled network!

./namebench -6

Gibson Research Corporation has a similar tool called Domain Name Speed Benchmark. It is available for Windows and works under Linux via Wine.

https://www.grc.com/dns/benchmark.htm

Domain Name Service Benchmark

DNS Benchmark

Future Discussions about DNS

  • Blocking online advertising with DNS
  • Encrypted DNS lookups to preserve your privacy

Selecting the Best Geographical Location for your Hosting

Choosing the best geographic location for your hosting

How to choose the best  geographic location for your hosting.

Selecting the best geographical location for your hosting is as difficult as your needs are or are not.

We have a simple four-step process to help you get started in determining the right geographical location for your hosting.

1. First, you need to establish who the audience is to be served from your hosting.  Is the audience yourself? Is it local or regional businesses? Or is it something more complicated?

2. Second, you need to establish where your audience geographically is located.  Is the audience in a single state or multiple states?  Are they in a limited geographical region like say the US Northeast? Or perhaps they are are mostly in a country like France?

3. Third, you should try to determine (where you can and where dealing with a limited audience) who their upstream providers are (read: their ISP).  If your audience is small and anticipated to be focused on a limited geographical area this is doable.  If your audience is large or broad geography, then this step probably isn’t able to be accomplished.

4. Fourth, you should try to determine the network route between your hosting and your audience. Is there good local or regional peering in place, or do packets travel the long route states away.  This travel will add usually unnecessary latency.  This step is highly relative when you have local and regional audiences.

Tools to Determine Routing and Latency

Linux has several tools you should become familiar with that will help in solving network issues, viewing latency, seeing how packets travel, etc.  There are similar tools available in Windows by default.

The most common tools to become familiar with are:

ping – returns a simple time value for each packet indicating the time for packet to be sent to the remote location and acknowledgement to happen and be received by the origin location.  This is the easiest form of latency testing, but only shows a portion of the total network picture.  The lower the ping ms value the better.
(note: some networks may ignore or drop ping requests – it indicates a traffic management policy and does not mean their network is failing)

Example: ping 4.2.2.2

PING 4.2.2.2 (4.2.2.2) 56(84) bytes of data.
64 bytes from 4.2.2.2: icmp_req=1 ttl=56 time=77.3 ms
64 bytes from 4.2.2.2: icmp_req=2 ttl=56 time=83.0 ms
64 bytes from 4.2.2.2: icmp_req=3 ttl=56 time=80.7 ms
64 bytes from 4.2.2.2: icmp_req=4 ttl=56 time=81.4 ms
64 bytes from 4.2.2.2: icmp_req=5 ttl=56 time=82.5 ms
64 bytes from 4.2.2.2: icmp_req=6 ttl=56 time=89.1 ms
— 4.2.2.2 ping statistics —
6 packets transmitted, 6 received, 0% packet loss, time 5007ms
rtt min/avg/max/mdev = 77.346/82.382/89.139/3.557 ms

traceroute – shows you the hops or steps your packets are traveling from your origin server to the remote location.  This will help you to see how far your hosting is from your audience.  The fewer the hops, usually the better.

Example: traceroute 4.2.2.2

3  xe-0-0-1-3602.cr1.tor2.ca.nlayer.net (69.31.143.109)  79.876 ms te0-0-0-34.215.ccr22.yyz02.atlas.cogentco.com (38.104.251.245)  81.321 ms  80.824 ms
4  ae0-30g.cr1.tor1.ca.nlayer.net (69.31.143.24)  79.119 ms be2437.ccr21.alb02.atlas.cogentco.com (66.28.4.197)  85.997 ms  84.276 ms
5  be2106.ccr21.jfk02.atlas.cogentco.com (154.54.3.49)  87.131 ms ae2-50.tor10.ip4.gtt.net (199.229.230.89)  79.409 ms  79.704 ms
6  * as3356.tor10.ip4.gtt.net (46.33.80.42)  76.615 ms be2063.ccr21.jfk05.atlas.cogentco.com (154.54.47.58)  78.647 ms
7  4.68.62.25 (4.68.62.25)  90.480 ms * *
8  b.resolvers.Level3.net (4.2.2.2)  89.036 ms  88.008 ms  90.349 ms

mtr – is essentially a more refined traceroute that continues to make attempts, averages times, shows the high and low ranges.

Example: mtr 4.2.2.2

3. xe-0-0-1-3602.cr1.tor2.ca.nlayer.net                                   0.0%     8   70.5  87.8  70.1 146.8  27.6
4. ae0-30g.cr1.tor1.ca.nlayer.net                                         0.0%     8  130.8  86.9  66.9 149.3  33.2
5. ae2-50.tor10.ip4.gtt.net                                               0.0%     8   73.2  75.7  63.1  98.0  11.2
6. as3356.tor10.ip4.gtt.net                                              37.5%     8   79.0  86.8  72.4 128.0  23.4
7. ???
8. ???
9. ae-72-72.csw2.NewYork1.Level3.net                                      0.0%     8   98.1  87.6  81.8  98.1   6.3
10. ae-2-70.edge2.NewYork1.Level3.net                                      0.0%     8   83.1  86.1  79.9  96.8   5.6
11. b.resolvers.Level3.net                                                 0.0%     7   81.2  82.1  78.3  88.4   3.1

mtr and traceroute may not be included in your default OS installation.   In Debian, to add these simply become root and type:
apt-get install traceroute mtr-tiny

Simple Facts

The closer your servers are to your audience, will almost always  result in better performance.  The closest you can get without exotic hosting arrangements is to be on a direct peered network.  Networks are often oversold by internet providers and have undue latency.  So no two networks will perform identically even if they are on paper identical.   Latency for instance might be low (which is good) but throughput on one of the networks might be severely limited (which is bad).

Serving your customers from multiple timezones away or from opposite side of a country in a place like the United States is introducing too many unknown variables over that packet path.  Slow throughput could be on either end, it could be an overloaded network hop along the way, it could be QoS intended to shape traffic for the common good (i.e. to stretch the finite commodity of their bandwidth).

Sample Scenarios

Your audience is in New York City, New York, USA.  They use many different providers.  Your solution would be to choose a hosting plan in a facility with diverse upstreams (multiple upstreams) including peering to the popular NYIIX public peering exchange.  Ideally much of your traffic will stay local and go via the peering exchange or via other routes where there is an often common upstream provider on both ends.

Your audience is in a lesser tier city like Syracuse, New York, USA.  You should be able to focus in lower tier cities on incumbent telco providers and the franchise agreement issued cable company to address most of this audience.  Locate an IP addresses for the telco and cable franchise where such a duopoly exists.  Perform ping, traceroute and mtr tests between you hosting location and audience in Syracuse.  If you are lucky, a market like Syracuse will backhaul traffic to New York city to get out to the rest of the internet, and you can deal with a hosting provider in New York City or nearby that has multiple upstreams and NYIIX peering.  If you are pushing lots of bandwidth or latency sensitive applications like VOIP or video you may do best to host within the incumbent networks and within the actual geographic market you are serving.  This approach of dealing with incumbents and within their network often is rather expensive and limited only to very large companies (due to cost and complexity).

Your audience is in France, a country you know not so much about.  Fortunate for you, latency in Europe is noticeably lower than say in the United States.  Your testing simply would  be focused on major European peering exchange points (amsix, LINX, DE-CIX, etc.) and latency/time to major internet providers within France.  You want a provider, as always, with diverse upstreams and peering exchange transit.

Do these approaches work 100% of the time for every member of audience? No.  However, those on healthy modern networks with good routing and minimal network QoS or other introduced delays will absolutely see a noticeable increase in performance.

One other way to partially address these other audience members is through use of the third-party CDN service.  While CDNs are more advanced solution, they aren’t perfect either.  You will pay heavily for a proper CDN worth considering and implementations can be rather complex.

In future related post we’ll discuss CDNs (Content Distribution Networks), when and where to use them, and content caching, why you need to cache your content.

About tmzVPS

tmzVPS offers affordable large resource virtual hosting solutions (VPS) from three different geographic locations in the United States, and one location in the United Kingdom. We offer unmanaged VPS packages for the more technically adept, and managed VPS for those just getting started.

tmzVPS servers use RAID10 disk arrays for data redundancy, and we perform daily backups of all servers for peace of mind. Our upstreams are diverse and they have peering to major internet traffic exchanges.

Contact us today to learn how tmzVPS can help you with you choose the best geographical hosting location to serve your audience.
sales@tmzvps.com

Mapping Remote Storage Securely over the Internet with SSHFS

Sharing Datacenter Storage with Your Desktop

Let’s start with why you would want to map disk storage in a remote datacenter to your desktop or local server.  Some common benefits include:

1. Remote storage provides off site geographically different redundancy or backups in case of data loss (drive crash, fire, flood, etc.)
2. Datacenters usually have much faster bandwidth more suitable for doing large downloads, website mirroring, intelligence gathering, etc.
3. Remote disk storage in a datacenter gives you flexibility of accessing your data from anywhere in the world.
4. Remote disk storage mapped with SSHFS can be used just like a local drive (with some considerations for performance limitations1)
5. You can leave your important files safely on remote storage to prevent loss, theft or damage that is very common with portable devices (notebooks, tablets, smartphones, etc.)
6. When used in conjunction with a remote desktop computing environment, you can access data in simple way from your remote desktop environment.

Encryption – Keeping Your Data Secure

SSHFS transports data over an encrypted channel.  Your data is secured from prying eyes.  The encryption does have math computation overhead, so transfers typically will not be as fast as insecure transports like HTTP or FTP.

You want encryption to prevent theft of your data and generally to keep things private.  Many standards for professions require secure handling of corporate data, and protection of your customer’s data.  Plain text transfers therefore are not ever recommended.

What You Need to get SSHFS Running

1. A remote dedicated server or VPS (must have FUSE enabled2)
2. Debian Linux (others Linux varieties will work with some slight modification)
3. openssh-server (included and installed normally by default)
4. ssh-keygen (included with the ssh package)
5. sshfs
6. Root access

Terms:

localhost = the desktop I am working from
192.168.1.66 = the ‘remote’ server (in this case another computer on the same local area network (LAN) )

We will be mapping:
/media/remotestorage on localhost
to
/media/share on the remote server (192.168.1.66)

Becoming Root and Why to Limit Your Time as Root

Root is the supreme all controlling account in Linux.  Root has access to everything and can entirely destroy your server if misused.  Root access is needed to install software, add a user on the remote server and initiate the SSHFS connection.  In this tutorial, we will run sshfs as root as a proof of concept and so complexity is reduced. It is possible to get SSHFS operating as normal user, but that is further complexity. We note that anything with root access is a potential security issue.

To become root, find the terminal program and from within it:
localhost$ su
(then provide the root password)

If you do not have root access or cannot access such, we may be able to help you, please submit a support ticket to tmzVPS for assistance.

Create Your Public and Private Keys on Your Local Computer

Since we want to emphasize the security aspect of this, we are going to create a 4096-bit SSH key which is longer than default key size.  This creates crytographic complexity and is less likely to be vulnerable to security attacks (shorter key sizes are reported to be vulnerable from computation attacks)

localhost$ ssh-keygen -t rsa -b 4096
This creates a RSA key with a length of 4096.

Generating public/private rsa key pair.
Enter file in which to save the key (/root/.ssh/id_rsa):
Enter passphrase (empty for no passphrase):
Enter same passphrase again:
Your identification has been saved in /root/.ssh/id_rsa.
Your public key has been saved in /root/.ssh/id_rsa.pub.
The key fingerprint is:
f1:fb:9e:7a:30:1d:2f:06:e2:d0:f0:cc:ec:dd:af:df root@localhost
The key’s randomart image is:
+–[ RSA 4096]—-+
|                 |
|      .          |
|       B.        |
|      . Bo. .    |
|       +So.+ o   |
|        o +.= .  |
|          .+ o   |
|           ….. |
|          .+=o. E|
+—————–+

Step 2: Copy the public key to remote-host using ssh-copy-id

localhost$ ssh-copy-id -i ~/.ssh/id_rsa.pub 192.168.1.66

The authenticity of host ‘192.168.1.66 (192.168.1.66)’ can’t be established.
ECDSA key fingerprint is 66:d5:54:fd:4c:65:57:60:a9:eb:df:cf:d4:02:c2:5b.
Are you sure you want to continue connecting (yes/no)? yes
Warning: Permanently added ‘192.168.1.66’ (ECDSA) to the list of known hosts.
root@192.168.1.66’s password: [provide your password here]

Step 3: Login to remote-host without entering the password

localhost$ ssh 192.168.1.66
Last login: Sun Aug 17 12:22:00 2014 from
[Note: SSH should NOT ask for password.]

root@192.168.1.66$ exit (to quit and return to the local computer)

Step 4: Create Local Directory to Map the Remote Storage To

root@localhost$ mkdir /media/remotestorage

Step 5: Mounting Remote Disk Storage over SSHFS

root@localhost$ sshfs username@remotehost:/media/share /media/remotestorage -o reconnect,compression=no,auto_cache,cache_timeout=5,transform_symlinks,allow_other,idmap=user,ServerAliveInterval=60,ServerAliveCountMax=3,StrictHostKeyChecking=no

DONE!

Now you are ready to work with your remote storage as-if it were local.  You can use common desktop tools including the file manager, rsync, cp, mv and rm.

When you are done using the drive or when it ceases to function properly, you will need to unmount the drive:
root@localhost$ umount /media/remotestorage

(sometimes this will fail due to other programs having that disk open, if that occurs: umount -l /media/remotestorage)

If you want to reconnect to your remote storage you do this:
root@localhost$ sshfs username@remotehost:/path/ /media/remotestorage -o reconnect,compression=n,auto_cache,cache_timeout=5,transform_symlinks,allow_other,idmap=user,ServerAliveInterval=60,ServerAliveCountMax=3,StrictHostKeyChecking=no

Future Related Blog Posts for SSHFS Use

We will add some posts in the future with common Linux tools usage included in major distributions that will enhance your use of remote storage and SSHFS. These will include rsync, duplicity, midnightcommander (mc), and basic command line file manipulation.


 

1 Remote disk storage will be limited to the bandwidth throughput between the local computer and the remote server.  Large data like audio and video will work for playback.  Editing of such will be extremely slow and may fail.

Typical text files, programming code and average office style documents will work usually very similar to local disk.

2 VPS environments in particular, OpenVZ requires your provider enables FUSE for SSHFS to work.

To enable FUSE: localhost$ modprobe fuse

Then check to see if it is enabled and working:
localhost$ lsmod | grep fuse

Output:
fuse                   52144  1

If FUSE is not enabled, ask your VPS provider to enable it and send them here:
link: http://wiki.openvz.org/FUSE

Ip, subnets, cidr, usable ips. usable ip's, Ip, subnets, cidr, usable ips. usable ip's, Ip, subnets, cidr, usable ips. usable ip's,

IP Addresses | Quick Reference Guide (CIDR, SUBNET MASKS & USABLE IP’s)

Often we get questions, how many ip’s do i get to use with a /27, what’s a /27 etc. Now you can simply look at our cheat sheet below and it will tell you exactly how many usable IP’s you have, the subnet masks and the CIDR.

ipgraph

I hope this helps. If you have any questions feel free to post in the comments below :).

Bo P.

openvz logo

How to fix OpenVZ quota issues

While searching various forums, posting & chatting, I have realized that many VPS providers are having issues with their quotas on their VPS plans. If your clients cannot set specific disk space limits, and everything shows as unlimited than second level quotas are not enabled. Here is a small tutorial on how to do this.

1. Login into the host-node.

2. Find the CTID of the VPS that is having the quota problem.

3. To enter that specific VPS input this command into SSH. Remember to change the CTID with the # from that specific VPS.

 nano /etc/vz/conf/CTID.conf

4. Once in the configuration file, under “# Disk quota parameters” add this line:

QUOTAUGIDLIMIT="500"

5. Click CTRL + X then Y to save the file and then ENTER.

6. Restart the VPS.

7. Go back in the VPS again and run these two commands.

/scripts/initquotas

And then:

/scripts/fixquotas --force

This will fix the quota issue your client(s) are having. If you have any questions feel free to post in the comments.

choice

Top 9 Reasons Why You Need A Managed VPS

Are you and your business loosing valued customers due to your website being slow or not meeting the growth of your business? Then a Managed VPS is a very affordable solution solution that many businesses rely on today. It can be setup the same way as shared hosting, just a lot more secure and much more room for your business to grow.

Below are the top questions which you should ask yourself to see if a scalabe, flexible & powerful Managed VPS is for you.

1) Does your business depend on your website?

In the past 10 years, many businesses have completely switched their business online. For the business to operate correctly and to keep clients satisfied it must be running 100% of the time without any slowdowns or performance issues. A Virtual Private Server gives you a number of benefits that Small & Medium sized businesses require.

2. Do you notice any performance issues on your website currently?

On a shared server, you most likely see slowdowns from time to time. It’s a common problem, since the server is usually shared with 300+ clients. Medium to High traffic websites benefit from a VPS because it’s not affected by the traffic demands of other sites, as can be the case on a Shared Server.

3. Do you have any security concerns or host sensitive data?

With our Managed VPS plans, your data and database remains on a secure partition, completely not accessible by other customers. All of the data, information you collect will be stored in a secure area so your customers are ensured complete privacy. A Managed Dedicated Server has the same thing, but a VPS is way more cost effective and scalable at the same time.

4. Are you experiencing rapid growth?

You may not be able to predict your websites growth over the next few months, but you do know you are growing. A dedicated server to start with is most likely unnecessary. With a VPS plan you can start small and simply upgrade without any downtime or committing any major monthly overhead.

5. Is more than 20% of your business revenue generated online?

If that is true, than that automatically makes you an ecommerce business. That simply means that you can’t afford for your site to have performance, security or downtime issues, because that will result in customers losing interest before completing the sale. With our Managed VPS plans you can expect 100% Uptime and High performance giving you higher conversion & sales rates.

6. Have you ever had an immediate need for more hosting resources?

We all have at some point. If you run a promotion that increases your traffic by 100% for example, you will need to spend a lot of money to upgrade your dedicated server or find a different solution which might cause downtime in between. With a VPS you can scale up and down as you like. If you project high traffic, simply upgrade your VPS plan to the next level. Once it drops down you can always scale back. It’s that easy and usually done with a few clicks. This means you have the benefit of On-Demand resources to meet your demanding needs.

7. Can your business afford downtime or slow page loads?

How much do you think 30 minutes of downtime costs your business? How much business would you loose if your site is sluggish and has performance issues? Can you afford to loose any amount of business revenue especially in this economy? Most businesses can’t. A high-performing, fully managed VPS plan may cost you $30+ a month but can easily save you 100x in revenues.

8. Is your time better spent building your business instead of managing your own server and configuring the VPS?

All of our Managed VPS’s include full management. You do not have to worry about configuring it, making sure everything is up to date, securing it etc. We will do all of the work in the background, and if you simply have an issue feel free to contact our Command help desk. Compared to hiring a Systems Administrator or Developer, a server concierge VPS plan is a fraction of the cost.

9. Concerned that you might need to upgrade to a dedicated server in the future, but not ready today?

Here is another great reason why upgrading to a VPS should be your next move. Your VPS plan is completely portable. Meaning that if you ever purchase a dedicated server, we can simply do a live migration which makes the transfer painless, and your customers will not notice any of this.

Keep these questions in the back of your mind as your business grows and constantly changes. You might even want to schedule a periodic audit of your business to determine if it’s time to upgrade or not. If you have any specific questions feel free to contact our sales desk to discuss any options available to you that will best suit your needs.

How to add a staff member in WHMCS


In this tutorial you will learn how to add a staff member in WHMCS, this is crucial to growing companies that are wanting to add more members to their team. Adding a staff member is easy and has a lot of different options, but in this tutorial I will just be showing you the basics of how to add a staff member. If you have not purchased WHMCS you can do so via WHMCS.com or LicensePal.com if you would like to get it at a cheaper price. You must also have WHMCS already installed to be able to use this tutorial, WHMCS is very easy to install and is pre-packaged with instructions on how to do so.

Step 1.) Login to your WHMCS admin panel.

Step 2.) Find the “Setup” tab on the main navigation.

Step 3.) Find the link when hovering named “Administrators” and click on that.

Step 4.) Once you’re on that page it will list your current account and other accounts (If you have added other accounts).

Step 5.) Above all of the accounts you should find a link that says “Options: Add New Administrator”, you will need to click that.

Step 6.) Once you’re on that page, you will have some fields and options to fill out, make sure in the “Administrator Role” field you choose the correct position for that staff member, you can add new administrator roles however that will be added in another tutorial on how to do that.

Step 7.) Once you’ve filled everything out you should be done, if you need any help feel free to comment below and we’ll do our best to help you out!

How to raise your websites rankings in Google

Everyone always wants to know how to get your website high in search engines like Google, Yahoo! and Bing. People tend to think that you have to have a big budget to hire an SEO expert, and that’s not true at all. You can do SEO yourself if you have time and dedication. In this article I will be posting some beginners steps to get you started on learning SEO.

The most important thing to take into consideration is to not spam your websites link or your website with irrelevant content, this might get you fast website views but will not help you at all in the long run and will actually hurt your rankings in Google.

 

This list will be in order of the most important things to take into consideration for SEO.

1.) Unique Content – Make sure your website is filled with unique content (meaning not copying and pasting text from other websites onto yours), while also making sure that it is focused on your website niche.

2.) Back Links – Back links are very important, not just for SEO but also for traffic. When building back links make sure the links are on websites that are related to yours, you don’t want to post your link on random websites (Google considers these spam links and it will actually hurt your rankings).

3.) Titles – Make sure your website has appropriate titles on each page so Google knows what the page is going to be about.

4.) Fast Loading – Make sure your website is fast when visitors go to it, Google checks this and it does hurt your rankings if your website is slow believe it or not. Not only that, but if someone comes to your website and it loads slow they will most likely not come back.

5.) URLs – Make sure your URL is relevant to the pages content say if your page is about shared web hosting you would want your title to be url.com/shared-web-hosting not url.com/somerandomlettersandnumbers.

These are just 5 simple steps that can help you out a lot when researching and doing SEO, make sure not to get yourself caught up in Page Rank also. Page Rank is not a huge factor in SEO like it used to be, so don’t worry to much about that worry more about the content on your website. If you have any questions at all on SEO just comment below and i’d be glad to answer everyones questions!